Turkish Journal of Urology
UROONCOLOGY - Review

Role of monocarboxylate transporters in the diagnosis, progression, prognosis, and treatment of prostate cancer

1.

UROGIV Research Group, Universidad del Valle, Cali, Colombia

2.

Department of Surgery / Urology, Universidad del Valle, School of Medicine, Cali, Colombia

Turk J Urol 2020; 46: 413-418
DOI: 10.5152/tud.2020.20278
Read: 147 Downloads: 86 Published: 20 August 2020

Prostate cancer (PCa) is a disease with high morbidity and mortality rates, which requires finding new lines of approach. The significant advances in and interest of molecular biology in this condition have led to the discovery of elements profiled as an essential research target. Accordingly, we consider the importance of studying the role that monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) play in PCa. These transporters might have a functional characterization, possible diagnostic and therapeutic implications, and influence on the progression and prognosis of this cancer. We reviewed literature published from January 2010 to June 2020 in different databases and search engines to find studies that respond to our question. MCTs have a close correlation with PCa, contributing to their phenotype of glycolytic and acid-resistant metabolism. They determine the maintenance and progression of the disease depending on the expression of different molecular types of the transporter. Thus, MCT2 highlights as a biomarker in early diagnosis and MCT4 in poor prognosis and resistance. Finally, MCT1 and MCT4 profile as a potential therapeutic target by decreasing cell proliferation. In conclusion, MCTs play an essential role in PCa; therefore, they should be taken into account in subsequent studies for finding tools with clinical applicability and contributing to the reduction of the disease burden.

Cite this article as: Rodriguez JER, Garcia-Perdomo HA. Role of monocarboxylate transporters in the diagnosis, progression, prognosis, and treatment of prostate cancer. Turk J Urol 2020; 46(6): 413-8.

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ISSN 2149-3235 EISSN 2149-3057